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Archive for the ‘Breast cancer’ Category

http://livingbeyondbc.wordpress.com/

Living Beyond Breast Cancer has a new topic on their blog called “fear of recurrence.” The first post in the series is called “An Appointment to Worry.”

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Living Beyond Breast Cancer posted on Facebook a link to Laura Tasheiko’s breast cancer journal. I love the paintings and the way she processed her journey with them. I plan to spend more time there.

I also loved this post, “The tyranny of positive thinking.”

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This week, I’m going to see a local doctor about the pain, numbness and tingling in my shoulder, arm, and hand on the side where I had surgery and radiation.  On the 28th, I have my three-month visit to the imaging center in Denver for my mammogram and ultrasound. Later that day, I will have blood work and see my oncologist. The first week in February, I see a dermatologist. I scheduled that visit during one of my “Everything New or Different Must Be Cancer” stages, and, even though I’m over that for the time being, I decided to keep the appointment. I never expect to have any anxiety around these appointments, but sometimes it creeps up on me.

In the meantime, I’m doing some stretching, using ibuprofen occasionally, and applying heat once in a while when my arm becomes too painful and that seems to help for a while. I intend to ask for more help with lymphedema prevention, including instructions on stretching, exercise, and massage.

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I am having more pain in my left shoulder, numbness down my arm and tingling and numbness in my left hand and fingers.  It isn’t as painful as it is annoying. The more painful my shoulder is, the more numbness I have in my hand.  In the area where I had radiation treatment, I have a lack of sensation in my skin, but pain underneath in my muscles, especially under my arm and around my shoulder-blade.  I sometimes have a sharp pain when I reach for something over my head. Other times there is no pain, just a stretching sensation in my skin.

I thought it might be temporary, but it is happening more often and lasting longer. 

I’m wondering whether this is a typical side effect of radiation therapy or if it’s a sign that I’m developing lymphedema.  I’m also wondering if I should have been doing some range of motion or other exercises to prevent this, and whether exercise will help prevent it from getting worse or even make it better. No one has given me any information about this. But, no one told me that self-massage would prevent the fluid buildup around the surgery site that makes it difficult to get a good ultrasound reading until after it was already a problem. I don’t know why, since it is simple and works in a few weeks.

I will talk to my doctors about this when I see them in January. In the meantime, I found this November 2009 article online:

Many Breast Cancer Surgery Survivors Report Lingering Pain

Women at the greatest risk for chronic pain were ages 18 to 39 and had undergone breast-conserving surgery, or lumpectomy, in which doctors remove only the tumor and some surrounding tissue. Other risk factors for persistent pain included radiation therapy, which is directed at the breast area to destroy any remaining cancer cells after surgery.  There are several reasons that breast cancer survivors experience pain such as nerve damage or injury from the surgery or radiation, but in the future, nerve-sparing surgery may help take the sting out of this persistent pain, according to study authors. . .

Another doctor adds. . .

“Pain decreases quality of life and should be a cause to reach back out to the surgeon or radiologist and ask for a referral to a physical therapist for intervention,” says Kneece, who is also the author of “Your Breast Cancer Treatment Handbook.” “Most pain can be addressed and reduced or eliminated.”

And this – which I suspected, and so have been doing some stretching exercises on my own:

Physical therapists can help women develop a plan to reduce or eliminate pain. In general, range-of-motion exercises after surgery can help reduce the risk of pain, according to Kneece. “If not performed, there will be a fibrous tissue which forms in the area restricting motion and causing pain when the arm is stretched,” she says.

I want to find out if this is early lymphedema, or if it may be the results of fibrous tissue. Either way, it is getting worse, but it sounds like it can be addressed:

“If one notices increasing swelling accumulating in the affected limbs or trunk, it is likely an early warning sign of lymphedema and she should be evaluated by a fully certified lymphatic drainage therapist,” says occupational therapist Cathy Kleinman-Barnett, a lymphedema specialist at Northwest Medical Center, in Margate, Florida.

“The additional fluid buildup can cause abnormal sensations such as tingling, aching, [and] heaviness, and should diminish or stop with range-of-motion exercises, stretching, and massage to stimulate lymphatic flow,” she says. “There is help available, and women should not have to live in pain.”

This article was in CNN Health

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I’m adding links to blogs written by women about their experiences with breast cancer, living with and beyond this disease.  Just finding and reading these blogs is another journey for me. It will take some time, because I don’t want to hurry through it. I want to get to know these women and what they went through.  If you have a blog and it isn’t listed here (yet), please contact me and send me the link.  I’m looking forward to getting to know all of you.

At the same time, I can’t help but feel overwhelmed by the number of women experiencing just this one type of cancer. There are far too many of us.

I appreciate all of you sharing your lives with the rest of us.

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Resources for Women with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer from Living Beyond Breast Cancer  

Order Guide to Understanding Triple-Negative Breast Cancer, created by LBBC in partnership with the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation (download brochure, order brochure).

“This publication offers helpful information, whether you have just been diagnosed or you are moving forward after treatment. Learn common terms your doctor may use and what might increase your risk for developing this type of breast cancer. Get the facts on treatments, and find out how to deal with myths about this diagnosis. If you have finished treatment, sort through post-treatment concerns, including follow-up testing and managing the fear of recurrence. Read the experiences of real women affected by triple-negative breast cancer and tips from healthcare professionals.”

“Read our publication on Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Treatment Update and Tools for Healthy Living with Lyndsay N. Harris , MD, and Suzanne Dixon, MPH, MS, RD (transcript, audio recording). Hear the latest news on triple-negative breast cancer from medical and nutrition experts. Dr. Harris gives an overview of the biology of triple-negative breast cancer and explains how it differs from other types of breast cancer, who is at high risk and targeted treatments in the pipeline. Ms. Dixon explains how a low-fat diet and vitamin D may affect your risk of recurrence.”

“Listen to an audio recording on Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Understanding Treatment Options and Post-Treatment Concerns (audio recording) with Ramona F. Swaby, MD. Learn which groups are affected more often by triple-negative breast cancer and why. Dr. Swaby discusses available treatment options including a review of the latest research in targeted and biological therapies, how to manage follow-up care and the importance of participating in clinical trials to further research development.”

Living Beyond Breast Cancer

Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation

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More about Carolyn Scott Kortge, author of  The Spirited Walker: Fitness Walking for Clarity, Balance, and Spiritual Connection

Recent post – Spirited Walking and Pheasants

 

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