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Posts Tagged ‘treatment’

On April 21, 2009, Living Beyond Breast Cancer presented an audioconference called Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Treatment Update and Tools for Healthy Living

“Get an overview of the latest information, research and treatments for triple-negative breast cancers. Learn more about risk factors and screening, and get practical advice on nutritional and lifestyle choices that can help reduce your risk of recurrence.”

Link to download the podcast

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Living Beyond Breast Cancer has a new Guide to Understanding Treatment Decisions that will help newly diagnosed breast cancer patients interpret their test results and create an individualized plan for care. The brochure explores understanding the pathology report and the results of genomic tests, paying for tests, working with treatment teams and making decisions about surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and other adjuvant treatments.

Visit their web site to download or order a free copy.
PDF copy of the report

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Not Grace

Not Grace

I imagined the perfect dog . . . a substantial dog. A dog that a person could respect. A five-year-old female black lab who was housetrained, well behaved, with a mellow personality (yet a watch dog), who had lost her person and was just looking for a quiet home in the country where she could lay at someone’s feet while they worked at a desk, that would curl up for an evening of reading or tv, a dog that would only need an occasional stroll (never running! or frisbee!) and liked riding in the car without having a nervous breakdown, needing a tranquilizer, or throwing up.  I had already named this imaginary but substantial dog, Grace.

Then I actually found her online.  A five-year-old female black lab named Grace. The rescue organization across the state line in Kansas didn’t give any information on the rest of the qualities.  But they never returned my call. In the meantime, my mother encouraged me to get a puppy, and, to make a long story short, I got another “insubstantial” dog – a Malitpoo (cross between a Maltese and a Poodle).  Just like Jessica Simpson’s dog Daisy.  (Sigh. How embarrassing!)

The first few days after I got her home – along with new crate, blanket, dishes, toys, puppy training papers, and after the vet checkup, I slept on the couch with her in the crate on the floor beside me. I woke up every three to four hours all night long, put on her halter and leash, and we went outdoors no matter what. She soon got the message, and I was soon exhausted. Maybe she was, too, because she took a nap each morning and afternoon.

When I went to Arizona for a week, my mother baby-sat the dog. Mom reported that they both slept all night long without any trouble or mess. So when I got home, we did, too!

Then the puppy  got sick — really sick, and I was very upset. I couldn’t go through another sick dog already — my last poor doggy who was 17 years old was so sick for so long before I lost her that I couldn’t face it again. I was crying around, “what have I done!!!”  So there were more vet bills, but the medicine worked, and after incurring yet more vet bills, the lab reports confirmed that she was okay now — she was cured.  $$$$$$$$.  $$$$$$$$.

pinky-001Now we’ve gotten used to each other and we’re best buddies.  She isn’t the perfect dog. Her hair is growing out and it looks like this. She will never have a substantial stature or command respect, especially if she always has a bad hair day.  She likes to unroll the toilet paper, she takes every shoe left on the floor into her crate, and her name isn’t Grace. It didn’t suit her.  So her name is Pinky Sparkle Twinkle.  (All my other pets were named after Greek and Egyptian gods and goddesses and radical personalities from the 60s.)

But she doesn’t have to have a long run outdoors every day and she can play fetch in the house with her tiny toys. She likes to lay on the desk or in my lap while I work. She’s trained to her puppy pads so we don’t have to go outdoors if it’s really cold and snowing, like it was the last couple of days. And she likes to ride in the car.

Now I know why my mom encouraged me to get her. She makes me laugh – and that churns up the endorphins. I have something to think about and take care of besides myself. She’s a little demanding, and that’s okay because I have to give in some times and do what she wants even though we pretend I’m still the boss of both of us. She likes to play, so I have to play, too, sometimes, and it’s a long time since I played. She likes to cuddle, and I haven’t had anything to cuddle for a while.  Having her around is more fun than eating fresh broccoli. This may be why “they say” (as Mom said) that people who live alone “do better” when they have a pet.

So we’re committed now.

And some day we may get a call from Grace, and we’ll have room for her, too.

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